Stop for a second and think about how many people on earth might have your exact name.  Where do they live? What do they do for a living?  Are they well known?  Young? Old? Good? Bad? Criminal?

Say your name is Jane Googleydaski and you’ve just applied for a job.  Your potential employer decides to Google your name, and clicks on the first result that they see.  It turns out theirs another Jane Googleydaski living in the same state as you, and they’re a racist bunny rabbit killer.  What’s worse is that they own the domain name JaneGoogleydaski.com, and they run a website broadcasting their racist bunny rabbit killing ways. The boss doesn’t know that this isn’t the good Jane who applied for the job, and there’s a good chance her resume has now gone from the candidate pile to the paper shredder.

Unfortunately, since the good Jane Googledaski never though to own her domain name, the bad Jane beat her to it, and now anybody who wants to look her up is going to think she’s the racist bunny rabbit killer. 

You can prevent this tragedy from happening to you by going to a domain registrar like GoDaddy or 1and1 and purchasing yourname.com.  It’s cheap – between $6.99 and $8.99 a year, and easy to set up.

What do you do from there?  It all depends on what you want to do with your life.  The idea is to market yourself, and to control the first bits of information somebody finds when they search for you.  If you want to become a lawyer, just put up your resume.  If you want to be a professional photographer, display your photography.  If you handyman looking for work, list your abilities and give people a way to contact you.  But if you’re really stuck on what you’d put there, don’t sweat it.  At least you don’t have to worry about another person registering your domain name. You now own it.

Written by Sean Henri